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Emerging Researcher Programme 2012

In July 2012, a research training workshop on the Economics of Tobacco Control was held at UCT. The workshop was attended by eleven delegates from eight countries: Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Mauritius, Nigeria, Cameroon, Niger and Ghana. Workshop sessions included exposure to current tobacco control research training in technical and methodological tools, proposal writing and research management. Delegates applied for small grants which will enable them to do an economic study in their own countries. Five proposals were accepted (listed below).

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July 2012 workshop participants and presenters

It is envisaged that another emerging researcher workshop will be held in the second half of 2013. Calls for expressions of interest will be sent through the ATCC and African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) in the first half of 2012.

As part of the project’s mandate to increase research capacity in Africa, delegates to the emerging researchers’ training workshop an apply for funding in a competitive process. The modest funding will allow delegates to conduct research, typically using existing data. The results of these research projects are expected towards the end of 2013.

Philip Dalinjong (Ghana)

A retrospective analysis of the association between tobacco smoking and deaths from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in the Kassena-Nankana districts of Northern Ghana

The study seeks to identify the major causes of death among smokers in rural northern Ghana using verbal autopsy data. Adult deaths aged 18 years and above from 2004-2010 will be considered for the analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models will be used to assess the relationship between smoking and dying from cardiovascular diseases and acute respiratory infections. The study will contribute to our understanding of the relationship between smoking and cause of death.

Zakariaou Njoumemi (Cameroon)

Tobacco and poverty: a nationwide analysis of socioeconomics of tobacco consumption and tobacco expenditures among households in Cameroon

This research aims to investigate the link between tobacco and poverty with two objectives: (1) to assess the determinants of tobacco consumption and smoking prevalence by socioeconomic status of individuals and (2) to determine the impact of tobacco expenditures on the consumption of other basic goods and services by different income groups of households. It uses a nationwide cross-sectional data from the 2007 Cameroon Household Consumption and Expenditures Survey collected by the National Institute of Statistics. A logistic regression model will be used to assess the socioeconomic and demographic determinants of tobacco consumption and smoking prevalence while a Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) model will be used to determine the impact of tobacco expenditures on the consumption of other basic goods and services by different income groups of households.

Premduth Burhoo (Mauritius)

Self-reported price of cigarettes consumption and compensatory behaviours in a cohort of Mauritian smokers before and after a tax-increase

As from November 2010, custom excise duty went up from MUR 2,200 to MUR 2,750 per thousand cigarette sticks (i.e. an increase of 25%). In November 2011 a second increase of 15% took effect and since then a rate of MUR 3,160 is applicable on cigarette imports. The objective of the study is to assess the impact of the tax increase on cigarette price and consumption. Data from 3 waves of the ITC Mauritius Survey will be examined. Baseline sample data (from W1 & W2 i.e. pre-tax increase) will be compared with follow-up sample (W3 data i.e. post-tax increase).The study is expected to provide decision makers with evidence on the strength of tobacco taxation as a measure to reduce tobacco consumption.

Nkolika Uguru (Nigeria)

Investigating tobacco use and expenditure patterns among different social-economic groups in Nigeria

The economic cost of tobacco consumption in Nigeria varies among people of low, middle and high-income earnings. Tobacco companies argue that tobacco sales have a positive impact on the economy ignoring the individual costs borne by the citizens as a consequence of tobacco use. Information on use and expenditure of tobacco among various socioeconomic groups in Nigeria is currently limited and so the economic impact of tobacco use on households is unclear. This study aims to use a nationally representative dataset to assess tobacco use and expenditure among different socioeconomic status groups in Nigeria. The evidence generated from this study will highlight the economic impact on households and also demonstrate which socioeconomic group bears the most cost. This will provide useful information for policy making decisions on implementation of effective tobacco control measures in Nigeria.

Oluwakemi Odukoya (Nigeria)

Does Tobacco use affect household resource allocation in Nigerian households?

Studies in several countries have demonstrated that tobacco use impoverishes individuals and households particularly among low-income groups. Locally generated evidence demonstrating the link between tobacco and poverty is needed in Nigeria but is currently sparse. This study aims to use a nationally representative dataset to assess the socio-economic determinants of tobacco use and to estimate the impact of tobacco use on the consumption on other essential commodities in Nigerian households. This information hopes to provide locally generated data that may support the link between tobacco and poverty in Nigeria and serve as a useful tool for tobacco control advocacy in Nigeria and other similar African countries.